Category Archives: Suspension system

TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM IN AUTOMOBILE | CONSTRUCTION AND WORKING OF TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM

INTRODUCTION TO TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM IN AUTOMOBILE

A torsion bar is a type of suspension system in an automobile is usually used in vehicles such as cars, trucks and vans. A suspension system is a significant and acute element of a vehicle’s design. Irrespective of the design, all suspension systems do the same functions. They keep the tires in contact with the surface of the road, upkeep the weight of a vehicle and absorb the forces produced by the movement and motion of the vehicle.

01 - WORKING PRINCIPLE OF TORSION BAR - TORSION BAR USES AND ADVANTAGES

CONSTRUCTION AND WORKING OF A TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM

Torsion bars are basically metal bars that perform the role of a spring. At one end, the bar is fixed rigidly in place to the chassis of a vehicle. The last end of the bar may be fastened to the axle, suspension arm, or a spindle, depending on the vehicle’s design. For instance a vehicle travels alongside the road, the forces made by the motion of the vehicle produce torque on the bar, which turns it along its axis.

Counteracting the torque is the fact that the torsion bar obviously wants to resist the twisting effect and return to its normal state. By doing so, the suspension supplies a level of resistance to the forces generated by the movement of the vehicle. This resistance is the basic principle behind a torsion bar suspension system.

01 - TORSION BAR MOUNTING IN CHASSIS - COMPONENTS OF TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM

WORKING OF TORSION BAR

Torsion bars use the twisting properties of a steel bar to offer coil-spring-like functions. One end of a bar is fixed rigidly to the vehicle frame. The further end is fastened to a wishbone, which acts like a lever that travels perpendicular to the torsion bar. When the wheel hits at a stone or projections, vertical motion is shifted to the wishbone and then, through the levering act, to the torsion bar. The torsion bar then twists sideways its axis to offer the spring force. European car manufacturers used this system widely, as did Packard and Chrysler in the United States, through the 1950s and 1960s.

01 - WORKING PRINCIPLE OF TORSION BAR - TORSION BAR WORKING PRINCIPLE

ADVANTAGES OF TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM

In this system there are several key advantages. The design of the torsion bar suspension takes up less area than other suspension systems. This makes the vehicle designers to create a more spacious passenger compartment. The elevation of the bars can also be varied more easily than other suspension systems. They are also extremely durable and habitually have a long service life.

DISADVANTAGES OF TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM

There are also several disadvantages of torsion bar suspensions. The main disadvantage is that these bars generally do not offer what is known as a progressive spring rate. Generally in suspensions with a progressive spring, the coils of the spring are spaced at dissimilar distances from each other. This permits the suspension system to aids braking, firm steering and handling, although providing for a smooth and comfortable journey. Vehicles with torsion bars are repeatedly tuned to either provide a more firm driving experience at the expense of ride smoothness, or a smoother ride at the expense of the vehicle’s handling quality.

RECENT TRENDS IN TORSION BAR SUSPENSION SYSTEMS

01 - VEHICLE WITH BEST SUSPENSION - GOOD SUSPENSION SYSTEM OF A VEHICLE

Torsion bar suspension systems were once relatively common in passenger vehicles, but today are used mainly for the suspension systems of trucks and sport utility vehicles. Some famous automobiles that used this type of suspension were the original Porsche 356, Volkswagen Beetle, Porsche 911 models that utilized an air-cooled engine, and significantly of the Chrysler line-up of cars from the late 1950s through the late 1980s.

air suspension system in an automobile | components of an air suspension system in an automobile | working of an air suspension system

What is an air suspension?

Air suspension is used to support the vehicle on the axles with an organization of air bags instead of steel spring, leaf or torsion or some coil springs. The air bags are also stated to as bellows. Suspensions with steel or torsion spring and added by the use of air bags are not considered as air suspensions. Generally the air suspension components are used on the rear end of the vehicle. Subjected to the condition, this type of air suspension will probably have to be dealt with for leveling drives.

Components of the air suspension

An air suspension generally has three basic components. They are air supply, the air bags and the height control valves.

01 - COMPONENTS OF AIR SUSPENSION SYSTEM - ALL PARTS OF AIR SUSPENSION SYSTEM

The air supply

The air supply system consists of the engine air compressor, the air tanks, air valves and air lines. The engine air compressor supplies air for all the air equipment on the vehicle. The pressure delivered by the compressor varies. For several years, the air supply was maintained around 120 to 125 psi but on some new vehicles this has been improved to 135 psi. Dash gauges are present that will supply system pressure information but all vehicles have what we say to as a “pop off valve”. You can get the valve “pop off” when the system reaches the maximum air pressure.

Air bags

They are simple rubber bladder that holds air. Air bags are also mentioned to as air bellows. The air bags are located in the middle of the frame of the vehicle and the vehicle axles. Air bags are estimated for weight and pressure capacities.

01 - AIR BAGS IN AIR USPENSION SYSTEM - AIR SUSPENSION SYSTEM CONTAINS AIR BAGS

Height Control Valve

Most of the HCVs are mechanical valves but electronic height control mechanisms are also available. The HCV is fastened to the frame of the vehicle. An L shaped linkage attaches the HCV to the axle. As the axle moves up and down in relationship to the frame, the linkage travels the valve or electronic mechanism. With mechanical valves, there is an airline from the air supply to the HCV. There is an airline from the HCV to the air bag or bags that it controls. The HCV also has an exhaust port. When the connecting linkage travels up, the HCV links the air supply to the air bags, inflating the bags. When the connecting linkage moves down, the HCV connects the air bags to the exhaust port, shrinking the bags. This controls the height of the vehicle. If the Height Control is electronic, by means of the control linkage moves up or down, an electronic sensor propels information to an electronic control. These controls will open or close air solenoid valves as needed to inflate or deflate the bags.

01 - HEIGHT CONTROL VALVE DESCRIPTION - CONSTRUCTION OF HCV

How the air suspension system functions.

The vehicle is upheld on the frame with a course of action of airbags. The vehicle air system, motor air compressor, tanks, lines, and so on. These supply air to the valves (HCV) mounted to the edge of the vehicle. The valves are associated with the airbags with an airline. The linkage which interfaces the HCVs to the axles pivots the HCV valving as it climbs and down. At the point when weight is added to the vehicle through the suspension of the vehicle, the air noticeable all around bags is compacted, the edge draws nearer to the pivot. This powers the HCV linkage up. As the linkage climbs, the valving of the HCV associate the air supply to the air bags. The included weight and volume swells the air bags, bringing on the frame to move far from the pivot.

01 - WORKING PRINCIPLE OF AIR SUSPENSION SYSTEM - AIR SUSPENSION SYSTEM WORKIG PRINCIPLE

As the edge moves back to the correct ride stature, the HCV linkage moves to the unbiased position. This moves the valving far from the air supply and secures the air noticeable all around sack to keep up the best possible ride height. As weight is expelled from the vehicle or the suspension movements weight away, the current weight noticeable all around bags can push the frame far from the pivot. The HCV linkage is dragged down. This associate the air bags to the HCV fumes port. As air is depleted from the air bags, the frame lets down towards the pivot. As the linkage climbs to the neutral position, the fumes port is shut and the air is again locked noticeable all around bags, keeping up fitting ride height.